Bridal show – Ivory and black stripes.

When my Aunty Marg went through her fabric stash and told me I could take what I liked I don’t think she expected this. A black and Ivory stripe taffeta that was so old I could tear it with a pin carefully pleated and sculpted into this amazing dress.

DSC_0815 DSC_0806

I used this dress for the finale of the parade. It worked beautifully with the black sequin bridesmaids. I also had a strapless sequin dress I borrowed back from its owner to use for the maid of honour.

DSC_0820 DSC_0822

388_weddings coast style 2015 393_weddings coast style 2015

The floral crowns were all made by Jill at the Little Bouquet in Merimbula. A tiny little comb held the veil in place and the crown sat over the top. I loved that they were so lush and dramatic, the perfect complement to a dramatic dress.

Bridal show – Sequin bridesmaids

I can’t thank enough the models who helped out with the bridal show. Our 3 lovely bridesmaids in matching sequins were such a wonderful addition to the event.

DSC_0598  DSC_0797 DSC_0715 DSC_0665

I am going to gush about this fabric for a moment. I have worked with these small sequins before and never tire of them. The sequins are sewn onto a stretch base making these dresses quite quick and simple to make. The fabric itself isn’t cheap (unless you want black) but with the reduced time they take to make can actually work out to be an economical choice. Not just for bridesmaids as I have seen these sequins in a bridal pearly white, silver and soft rosey gold. The dresses are also indestructible and need no ironing, perfect for a destination wedding. I carried these 3 black dresses to the expo in a woolies bag.

Hair for the show was all done by the team at Trendsetter hair. Makeup by Lisa Garner.

415_weddings coast style 2015

Tulle, you are the queen of ruffles

The final way that tulle excells is by making the most amazing ruffles. No need to hem the edge leaves them light and frothy.

Cute ruffles below and also a lovely sleeve.

dc7e6061cb1ab8b500ebde42f8cc174c

A wonderful technique using the ruffles vertically, narrower at the top edge and fuller at the hem.

c3ece779a22aa5353f62a5aba1ebbe73

Tulle wont hold a permanent pleat like some synthetic fabrics will but they can be put through the machine and will pleat beautifully if you only want to wear them once

51532832ecf7ffbaa629c5fb5ad31bfe

I don’t love the below dress but I do quite like the idea. Ruffles of tulle used between placed lace to give softness and texture. The ruffles on the dress below I think are a little too long but it is still very inspiring.1654bf433d17457883ad4e54a7b93913

This dress is not made of tulle but a skirt of cascading ruffles like this could be made easily. This skirt is so effective because the lines of the ruffles don’t follow the usual direction around the skirt.

575f0558ec56d87541bdd4d7b573a1d2

Simple but effective rows of tulle ruffles on a separate skirt.

64d47949e96cebe06e9b56fa338c61d1-1

The rest of my obsession with tulle here and here

 

Shibori wonderland

Tie dye has been reborn. The Japanese art of Shibori with its fine crinkles and deep Indigo is far more sophisticated than the tie dye of school craft and hippy music festivals.

The dress below and above are amazing examples of dyeing techniques used on a finished dress to create complex details. I think the thing that appeals to me the most is the danger involved at the moment when you take the lovely silk dress and place it in the dye, hoping for the best.

ac12bd4374e2748150e2049005fcc228

These dresses are made using a dye technique applied to the fabric before making. Less risky but still lovely.